Wallace and Bruce

Bruce and Wallace No less than six major battles which changed the course of Scottish and British history took place in or near Stirling, but it was the two of which chronicler Walter Bower wrote in 1440 that hold a special place in the hearts and minds of Scots everywhere.

The "divine power" reflects the belief of the two greatest leaders in Scottish history, William Wallace and King Robert the Bruce, that God was on the side of the Scots, as they faced greatly superior odds at Stirling Bridge and Bannockburn.

These two battles secured in the long term the distinctive identity of Scotland as a nation, and Stirling has always been conscious of the part it played in delivering the result

Whether by intellect or intuition, the rest of Scotland has recognised and concurred with this contribution. Seven hundred years to the day after the Battle of Stirling on 11 September 1997, "the settled will of the Scottish people" in the referendum was for a Scottish Parliament. It could not have been otherwise

  The site of the two great battles, fought for Scotland's freedom during the long War of Independance, 1296-1320, illustrated what was commonly said - "To Take Stirling is to Hold Scotland".

See also:

Scots Wha Hae

Written by Scotland’s national bard Robert Burns as a fictional address by King Robert ‘the Bruce’ to his gathered army during the Battle of Bannockburn, which took place near Stirling in 1314.