Which roads do the Council grit?

There is an online map that can be viewed to see which roads are treated.

Our Winter Service Policy details which roads will be targeted for treatment for ice and snow. These are categorised into Priority 1, 2 or 3. 

Priority One Routes

Receive precautionary salting and are roads which have a cumulative daily flow of more than 800 vehicles a day, including roads to Emergency Services establishments.

These routes shall receive precautionary salt treatment between 5.30 am and midnight and;

• Clearance of snow accumulations 24 hrs per day.
• The treatment of ice formations 24 hrs per day. 

Priority Two Routes

Comprise of roads which have a cumulative daily flow of more than 600 vehicles, and are salted if snow and ice are forecast beyond midday.

Priority Three Routes

Are identified tertiary routes where the cumulative daily flow of traffic is greater than 400 vehicles and Priority Four Routes cover all other roads including residential areas which are only treated in exceptional circumstances, with priority being given to locations with difficult junctions, gradients and bends

Why does the Council not grit all the roads and footpaths?

We are responsible for over 1016km of carriageways and over 612km of footways, footpaths and cycleways. The resources and financing we have in place would not be able to treat all parts of the network. More details can be found in our Winter Service Policy 

How often are roads gritted?

Priority 1 Routes

Roads covered in our priority 1 gritting routes are gritted upon receipt of a weather forecast indicating the onset of frost, ice or snow provided the forecast is issued sufficiently early.

These routes shall receive precautionary salt treatment between 5.30am and midnight and;

  • Clearance of snow accumulations 24 hours per day.
  • The treatment of ice formations 24 hours per day.

The roads treated to priority 1 standard are set out in the gritting route maps

Where the cumulative number of vehicles is within 5% of the threshold value then a 5 day (Weekday) average will be used to determine the winter service priority.

Priority 2 Routes

These routes will not receive precautionary salting, and any treatment of ice or snow will be carried out only when a specific instruction to do so is given by the Duty Manager, who has to be satisfied that the following criteria are met:

  1. The general outlook established from forecasts, other meteorological information, Icelert trends indicate that the prevailing ice and/or snow conditions are likely to continue beyond midday.
  2. That the treatment of priority 2 routes would not be detrimental to the level of Service required on priority 1 routes.

Priority 3 Routes

  1. These routes will only be treated in exceptional weather conditions. Treatment will require authorisation by the Senior Manager of Environment & Place, or their nominated representative.
  2. After a period of 72 hours of adverse weather, and a 2-day weather forecast predicting continuing severe adverse wintry conditions, will the Senior Manager of Environment & Place authorise the treating of priority 3 routes.

All other Routes

  1. The remainder of the public road network, priority being given to locations of difficult junctions, gradients, bends or short, sharp incline, together with reasonable lengths of carriageway adjacent to these specific problems.
  2. These routes will only be treated in very exceptional weather conditions. Treatment will require authorisation by the Senior Manager of Environment & Place, or their nominated representative.
  3. The treatment of all priorities (1 to 4) will result in significant resources being deployed, at substantial cost. Only after a period of 120 hours of adverse weather, and a 5-day weather forecast predicting continuing severe adverse wintry conditions, will the Senior Manager of Environment & Place authorise the treatment of priority 4 routes.

Who decides on whether the roads are gritted?

Stirling Council use a weather forecasting service and decides to grit the network based on the forecast received. The decision to grit the road is made by the Duty Manager and with the Duty Officer who monitors the forecast and weather stations around the clock in severe conditions.

Who is responsible for treating Motorways and Trunk Roads?

Scottish Executive provides a Winter Service for trunk roads and motorways, which run through the Council area.

BEAR Scotland carry out treatments on the A9, A82, A84 & A85, which includes any interchange, roundabouts and slip roads. (Telephone Number 0800 587 1107).

AMEY carry out treatments on the M9 (Keir R/about south) and the M80 which includes and interchange, roundabout and slip roads. (Telephone number 0800 521 660)

What do I do if my vehicle has been damaged by a gritter?

If your vehicle has been damaged by a gritter, please visit the Insurance Section to complete a claim form.

How do I request a grit bin?

Please visit our grit bin section to view requirements. Enquiries can be submitted online for requests and our Officers can check this complies with the Council's Winter Service Policy.

How do we know if roads have been gritted?

We have a vehicle tracking system in place for gritters. An on-board navigation computers that have data when when grit is being spread on the route is located inside the gritting vehicle. 

How are footways/footpaths prioritised?

Footway/Footpath Treatment

Treatment of ice conditions on footways, and footpaths, will only be carried out between the times (5.30 to 16.00hrs).

The treatment of footways and footpaths may have to be locally curtailed, due to the obstruction caused by wheelie-bins, on collection days. This situation will be most acute where mini-tractor equipment is used to treat footways. Due to the random nature of this eventuality the Council will only return once the wheelie-bins have been removed from the footways to carry out the required treatment.

Priority F1A – This priority relates to ice formation only

The footways and footpaths to be treated in the following sequence.

  1. Those immediately outside shops in urban, community or village shopping centres, where a minimum of three essential premises such as food shops, Post Offices etc. exist.
  2. Steps and ramps to underpasses and footbridges together with any associated footpaths.
  3. A connecting footway from the above shopping areas to nearby and identified public building. The connecting footway must be used, by the public, on a regular and predicable basis. Public buildings are those providing a primary and intensive service to the public during the majority of the day. This would include hospitals, health centres, police stations, libraries, local authority offices and post offices.
  4. Those immediately outside individual food shops and post offices in urban, community or village shopping centres.
  5. Adopted footways within sheltered housing or residential home complexes for the elderly.
b. Priority F1B – This priority relates to snow conditions
  1. Footways and footpaths will be treated in the following sequence, should resources permit.
  2. Those listed in Priority F1A (i to iii).
  3. One footway along Priority 1 carriageways within built-up areas, which best serves pedestrian traffic and/or serves the most, premises.
  4. Footways providing a pedestrian route to residential old peoples’ homes or sheltered housing complexes, from the nearest treated footway.
  5. Standing areas at bus stops.
  6. Those immediately outside individual food shops and post offices in urban, community or village shopping centres.
  7. Adopted footways within sheltered housing or residential home complexes for the elderly.

Footways and footpaths will be cleared, when snow exists unless specific information indicates that a thaw will take place before 8.00am.

c. Priority F2 – This priority relates to ice or snow and comprises the remaining footway/footpath network.

These will only be treated in very exceptional weather conditions and when resources permit. Treatment will require authorisation by the Duty Manager.

Note: Link footpaths will not be treated where alternative, albeit longer footway, routes are available.

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